Natural or Not?

If man flooded it, can it still be considered natural?

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“Why don’t we just let the Salton Sea dry up and return to its natural state?”

“The California Development Company flooded it. Why don’t they pay to fix it?”

Have you heard any of these questions, or even thought them yourself? You are not alone. Many people who begin to learn about the Salton Sea arrive at these inquisitive conclusions shortly after learning about the “Great Diversion” of 1905. But let us revisit together some historical facts and observations, and ask ourselves, “Is the Salton Sea natural or not?” Continue reading “Natural or Not?”

Recreation at the Salton Sea

Visit the Sea for bird watching, boating, camping, hiking or hunting!

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For those less familiar with the Salton Sea, it is not normally thought of as a modern day recreational destination. However, the Salton Sea is a popular site for campers, boaters, anglers, hunters and more. The southern shore is home to the Sonny Bono wildlife refuge, and many state managed duck and geese blinds for waterfowl hunters. Along the north shore of the Sea, 14 miles of shoreline have been designated for recreation, known as the Salton Sea State Recreation Area (SRA). This area provides access to kayaking, boating, camping, bird watching, photography and hiking [1]. Continue reading “Recreation at the Salton Sea”

Sink or Swim (or Float): Water Quality and Salinity

Can you swim in the Salton Sea?

You are going to the Salton Sea this weekend. It’s the desert; it’s going to be really hot, so you want to know if you will be able to cool off in the water. Considering the massive fish die-offs and the occasional nasty odor for which the Salton Sea is notorious, you might be concerned about the safety of swimming in the water. You probably want to know the answer to two questions:

First question: Can you swim in the Salton Sea?

Answer: Of course you can! It’s full of water, it reaches a depth of 50 ft., and there are plenty of crowd-free beaches. Not only can you swim in the sea, but you can also float really well. There are approximately 55 grams of salt per liter of water (g L-1). This salinity is higher than the ocean, which has ~33 g L-1; thus the water is more dense and, with no waves, the relaxation potential is greater [1].

Second question: Should you swim in the Salton Sea?

Continue reading “Sink or Swim (or Float): Water Quality and Salinity”

Bird is the Word

Over 400 different species of birds rely on the Salton Sea

Bird
Yuma Ridgway’s Rail. Aaron Maizlish, Ridgway’s Rail. 2014, click for link.

The Salton Sea is often construed by the news, documentaries, and other blogs as a post-apocalyptic wasteland that is devoid of life. However, this is an incorrect portrayal that has taken hold, most likely for its dramatic effect. In reality, the Salton Sea and its surrounding area is an oasis of biodiversity in the Sonoran Desert. Over 400 different species of birds utilize the sea for some portion of the year [1]. This makes the Salton Sea rank 2nd in avian diversity in the United States [2]. In addition to the sheer number of birds that rely on the Sea, it is important to consider which species of birds are there. Continue reading “Bird is the Word”