Category: Economy

Fun in the Salton Sun

Leer en español There has been a recent surge in interest in recreation at the Salton Sea, including the upcoming SEAthletes SEATalk and North Shore Xtreme recreation event, aimed at bringing more public attention to the Sea. However, this is only one chapter in a long history of public recreation at the Salton Sea.

Dust to Dust

Leer en español While there are many risks associated with the drying of the Salton Sea, perhaps the most concerning is the risk to public health. Previous posts on this blog discussed the health effects of dust from the Salton Sea, and that these health effects could end up costing around $29 billion. However, you

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Mexico and the Salton Sea

Leer en español So far, this blog has discussed extensively the ecological and socio-economic consequences of allowing the Salton Sea to dry up. The decline in the air quality around the Salton Sea due to exposed playa is a problem that will extend to many cities in the southwestern U.S., the economic burden of allowing

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A Clean Bill(s) of Health for Salton Sea Residents

Leer en español  Last week, an article was published by KCET that addressed the question of Why Don’t Californians Care About Saving the Salton Sea? The authors conclude that the seemingly artificial nature of the Sea is what keeps it from gaining public support, especially by environmental activists. However, I would argue that the real

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Desalting the Sea: Part 1

Leer en español Much like the Salton Sea, many inland bodies of water suffer from rising salinity, which can harm biota and prevent beneficial water use. This salinization occurs when soil, which contains salts and minerals, is mobilized from clearing natural vegetation or when fresh water is diverted for irrigation. [1] As irrigation water and drinking water

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Salton Sea Weed: Water and Agriculture in the Imperial Irrigation District

Leer en español Several months ago, the Torres Martinez tribe announced that they will be growing medical marijuana on tribal lands in the near future.[1] The income from this growing operation could provide the Torres Martinez tribe, and the surrounding area, with a much needed economic boost.[2] However, large-scale growing of the water-intensive marijuana plant

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The Torres-Martinez Band of Desert Cahuilla Indians

Leer en español The Torres-Martinez Band of Desert Cahuilla Indians has resided in the northern region of the Salton basin since 1876, when President Ulysses S. Grant officially established their tribe through an executive order. Members of the modern day Torres-Martinez Band have a large investment in the Salton Sea, literally. Over 10,000 acres of

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