This week, Salton Sea Sense is celebrating its one-year anniversary of blogging about the ecological, environmental, and cultural value of the Salton Sea. We have had the opportunity to explore and enjoy the Sea, meet passionate community members and informative stakeholders, and engage in a wide range of science and policy-making conversations on the future of the Sea. Plus, we have had a lot of fun doing it.

Here are the most popular Salton Sea Sense blog posts for the past year:

  1. Sink or Swim (or Float): Water Quality and Salinity of the Salton Sea – This is by far our most popular post, largely from the common search for “Can you swim in the Salton Sea?” The answer is a resounding yes, if you aren’t afraid of getting a little salty!
  1. Agriculture in the Imperial Valley: A Tale of Two Seas – The Salton Sea provides a controlled microclimate for agriculture in the dusty desert, while agriculture provides runoff that makes up the majority of the Sea’s declining inflows. Our second most popular post explains how the Sea and agriculture need each other in the Imperial Valley.
  1. The Salton Sea: A Beautiful Disaster – This was our very first post, and is still one of the most read. It summarizes the complicated history of the Salton Sea, and provided a great basis for the rest of our posts to delve into the specific challenges facing the Sea today.

Editor’s picks:

Natural or Not? – An argument we hear all too often against saving Salton Sea is that it is “man-made” and should be allowed to return to its “natural state”. Next time you hear it, debunk this argument by pointing out that technically speaking, water in the Salton Basin is indeed a natural phenomenon.

Dust to Dust – The largest risk of a drying Salton Sea is the exposed emissive playa and resulting threat to human health. This post does a great job of explaining the science behind those risks.

 

We would like to thank all of our followers and readers in Southern California and beyond for their continued support of Salton Sea Sense as a resource and advocate for the Sea. We look forward to continuing to play a role in the future of the Salton Sea by providing scientific and holistic perspectives.

We’d also like to thank the federal, state, and local stakeholders that have taken time to engage with us and inform our posts, as well as the many UC Riverside graduate student contributors and faculty advisors that have supported us. To that end, we would like to point out that this blog began in affiliation with the National Science Foundation WaterSENSE IGERT Program at UC Riverside. As of 2016, Salton Sea Sense stands on its own as an independent entity and any opinions or interests expressed here are entirely those of the authors.

Our group of contributors will be smaller and posts will be less often, but we are looking forward to another great year—we expect it to be an important one for the Salton Sea. Make sure you are following us on Facebook and Twitter to stay up to date!