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Salton Sea Sense

A resource for California's largest lake and potential environmental catastrophe

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December 2015

New Year’s Resolutions for the Salton Sea

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Since the 1980s, several studies have been conducted and many options have been evaluated to address the impending environmental challenges posed by the Salton Sea’s current conditions. Unfortunately, minimal changes have been implemented to improve the harsh conditions that are ever worsening for the local communities and ecosystems. Here at Salton Sea Sense, we are hopeful that 2016 will be the year that the Salton Sea finally gets the attention it needs to provide remediation for the exposed playa and secure a bright future. Continue reading “New Year’s Resolutions for the Salton Sea”

Recreation at the Salton Sea

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For those less familiar with the Salton Sea, it is not normally thought of as a modern day recreational destination. However, the Salton Sea is a popular site for campers, boaters, anglers, hunters and more. The southern shore is home to the Sonny Bono wildlife refuge, and many state managed duck and geese blinds for waterfowl hunters. Along the north shore of the Sea, 14 miles of shoreline have been designated for recreation, known as the Salton Sea State Recreation Area (SRA). This area provides access to kayaking, boating, camping, bird watching, photography and hiking [1]. Continue reading “Recreation at the Salton Sea”

Desalting the Sea: Part 2

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As mentioned in Desalting the Sea: Part 1, the Salton Sea is undergoing increasing salinization. Desalination, or “desal” for short, is a commonly proposed option to restore habitat and ecosystem health, and its role in the Salton Sea Restoration and Renewable Energy Initiative has been discussed. Part 1 explained the details of thermal distillation, and this accompanying post will introduce membrane filtration, another common desal technique. Continue reading “Desalting the Sea: Part 2”

RECAP: Salton Sea Authority Board of Directors Meeting

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Last Friday, December 10, the Salton Sea Authority (SSA) held their monthly Board of Directors meeting in Palm Desert. Members of the communities around the Salton Sea had a chance to address the board during the public comments portion of the meeting, and several people took advantage of this opportunity. There were also reports from members and affiliates of the Salton Sea Authority, including Val Simon of the US Bureau of Reclamation, and Dr. Bill Brownlie of Tetra-Tech, plus others. You can find the list of presenters and any documents presented at the meeting here. The Board reiterated that they will accept technical proposals from the public in a technical review committee. Continue reading “RECAP: Salton Sea Authority Board of Directors Meeting”

Join us for the Christmas Bird Count!

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Every winter, local chapters of the National Audubon Society host Christmas Bird Counts all over the Americas. These counts attract tens of thousands of volunteers who participate in observing and collecting data to help assess the health of bird populations and ultimately guide conservation action. Continue reading “Join us for the Christmas Bird Count!”

Let’s be SSWIFT about it

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The Salton Sea Water Incremental Funding in Time (SSWIFT) proposal is another reason to be optimistic about restoration at the Sea. [1] SSWIFT, which is backed by County of Riverside District Supervisor John Benoit and the Salton Sea Authority (SSA), could be a simple solution for mitigating fugitive dust while other projects that focus on wildlife preservation and energy development are established around the Sea. Continue reading “Let’s be SSWIFT about it”

Dust to Dust

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While there are many risks associated with the drying of the Salton Sea, perhaps the most concerning is the risk to public health. Previous posts on this blog discussed the health effects of dust from the Salton Sea, and that these health effects could end up costing around $29 billion. However, you may be thinking that these risks and costs are exaggerations or scare tactics. How could the dust from the Salton Sea make such a big difference when it is relatively small (343 square miles) when compared to the whole Salton Basin area of 8,360 square miles? Also, the majority of the basin is not covered by crops to reduce the wind erosion and transport of dust. So how can the drying of the Salton Sea which is approximately 3% of the total basin area, have such a disproportionate impact on the air quality? The answers to these questions lie in the composition of the sediment that lies below the Salton Sea. Continue reading “Dust to Dust”

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